History of Cedars Park

See how Theobalds Palace would have looked in 1607 in this animated 3D aerial view.

 

History of Cedars Park

1140First mention  of Thebaudes, Tibbolds or Theobalds. 
1554During the Tudor era, William Cecil, Secretary of State to Edward VI and Elizabeth I, buys the estate.
1564Sir William Cecil entertains Elizabeth I at Theobalds.
1572
 
Theobalds includes a Royal Apartment for Queen Elizabeth, who visited 15 during her reign.
 
1598William Cecil dies.
1603Elizabeth dies. Her successor, King James visits Theobalds. 
1606William Cecil's son Robert entertains the royal court at Theobalds.
1607James I exchanges Hatfield House for Theobalds Palace, which becomes his favourite residence outside London.
 
1625
James I dies at Theobalds Palace. His son Prince Charles is proclaimed King Charles I at the palace gates.
1642At the start of the Civil War, King Charles I receives a petition from Parliament at Theobalds
1649Charles is executed and much of Theobalds Palace is demolished piecemeal over time.
from 1765The Cedars, a gentleman's estate, was built on the site of the old palace.
1919
Admiral Sir Hedworth Meux presents the estate to Cheshunt to be used as a public park.

Every year, Enfield Archaeological Society (EAS) uncover some of Cedars Park's rich past during the Festival of Archaeology. Some recent finds include:

Historical jug topDog skeletonSpur buckleRemains of brick loggia, a Renaissance summer garden house